Sunday, February 28, 2010

Where am I?

I feel the menace of my solo show in May breathing down my back. Sometimes this is a good thing and sometimes it ties me in knots. Today I am in knots. I'm finally coming to the end of my very detailed visual slices of the garden which focus on an up-close view of many of the things that go unnoticed by visitors. I'll write more about how I came to choose this unusual format for my garden pieces nearer the completion of the work. But here's a little to move us along....

While the work looks extremely realistic it is not real. Each work is constructed from multiple views and angles of the same scene. These constructions are similar to the kind of collapsing that occurs with our memory of experiences as time adds her cloak. I plan to have 16 or 18 painting of this format depending on how severely I cull my work before the show. It's a good thing they are coming to an end because I don't normally work with this much detail and my neck is killing me.

These dainty little rock roses are exquisite with their centre sparkle. They are flowers that give their all and then quickly fizzle into a rain of petals. Their temporary nature appeals to me in the same way that the daylily plant does. They are reminders not to waste too many precious minutes of our lives. The abstracted, organic, root like background at the top references the cyclic nature of the plant kingdom. I don't have a title yet and I think I'm finished the painting.

The works in this series are more about pattern and less about highly realistic rendering. When you size them up closely, I've broken many rules. I'm struggling with providing enough information to form the plants and make them recognizable and realistic. I've constantly played with depth and scale, used limited shadows and take great liberties with point of view to create a more patterned effect.

6 comments:

-Don said...

Excuse me, Ma'am, but you need to quit being so hard on yourself. This is GORGEOUS. Thanks for the detailed account of what it stands for to you. I love how the petals on the ground lead our eyes up and into the composition where they cannot help but enjoy and feel the love poured into the creation of these flowers.

I've always heard it takes heat and pressure to create diamonds from coal. It looks like it's working here...

-Don

Margaret Ryall said...

Thanks Don. I have a long history of being hard on myself. It's hard to break. My problem is that I'm feeling painted out on this series. This July will make it two years. I've begun my encaustic pieces for this series- now that is my idea of fun.

Stan Kurth said...

Margaret your work is amazing. For me it was that first look at a slice of realism that pulled me in for a closer look. I like it when artists trick me into seeing. I'm compelled to dig deeper and deeper. The intricate patterns and designs are fascinating. I agree with Don, but I'm also getting ready for a solo in May and can certainly understand your frets. I'm not ready!!!

Kathy said...

Margaret - I whole-heartedly agree with Don and Stan. Your concept and execution of it are flawless and very interesting to study. You should be very proud of this work and all that you've produced for your exhibition!! Wish I could see it in person.

Blue Sky Dreaming said...

Always pain before a show...I understand completely.
I especially like the left corner and the bottom with the spent petals, the eye needs a break in the pattern of blooms...the center flowers go with saying...beautiful!

Margaret Ryall said...

Thank you all. I appreciate your comments and value your expertise. I might be a little (just a little) unsure since my last studio visit. Comments can be taken in so many ways and I am great at blowing things out of proportion.

Since I wrote this post I finished off another painting. I have several new ones to show over the coming weeks. I'm breathing a little easier. Doubt eats at you and consumes your confidence.